You are here
Home > Festival > Diwali Significance and Origin

Diwali Significance and Origin

Deepawali symbolizes the victory of truth over evil. Fireworks are one of the things always associated with this festival, which kids and adults both, can’t do without! On this auspicious day, people light up diyas and candles all around their house. They perform Laxmi Puja in the evening and seek divine blessings of Goddess of Wealth. The festival of Diwali is never complete without exchange of gifts. People present Deepawali gifts to all near and dear ones. Generally Goddess Laxmi and Lord Ganesh are gifted on the occasion as Goddess Laxmi is known as the Goddess of Wealth and the puja is performed to appease her and to seek her blessings throughout the year.
According to Hindu Mythology, Lord Rama was a great warrior King who was exiled by his father Dashratha, the King of Ayodhya, along with his wife Sita and his younger brother Lakshman, on his wife’s insistence. Lord Rama returned to Ayodhaya after 14 years of exile after killing demon King Ravana of Lanka, who was a great Pundit, highly learned, but still evil dominated his mind. On this auspicious occasion to honour Lord Rama’s victory over Ravana, the people of Ayodhya, welcomed King Ram, Laxman and Sita by lighting rows (avali) of clay lamps (dĭpa). Since then, this day is came to be known as “Deepawali”. Over the years, this word transformed into Diwali in Hindi and Deepawali in Nepali, but still retained its original form in South and East Indian Languages.

Leave a Reply